Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Brief Encounters: Italian Immigrant Workers and the CPR 1900-30

Bruno Ramirez
Labour / Le Travail
Vol. 17 (Spring, 1986), pp. 9-28
DOI: 10.2307/25142591
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25142591
Page Count: 20
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Brief Encounters: Italian Immigrant Workers and the CPR 1900-30
Preview not available

Abstract

LABOUR UNREST AND DEMANDS for social reform during and immediately after World War I prompted most provincial governments in Canada to enact limited minimum wage statutes, aplicable only to female wage-earners in specified industries. Minimum wage boards issued separate wage orders for each industry, after consultation with representative employers and employees. The standard for the minimum wage was decent subsistence for a single woman with no dependants and no need to save for sickness, layoffs, or old age. The Ontario Minimum Wage Board, established in 1920, insisted that if a minimum wage was a real minimum, employers did not object to paying it, or to cooperating with the board. To insure employer cooperation, the board provided employers with ample opportunity to present their views, but generally accepted employers' views over those of labour. Minimum wage statutes were justified not on the basis of a wage-earnér's right to a fair wage, but on women's special needs as the mothers of the future generation; the Ontario Minimum Wage Board expressed a similar attitude towards women in its administration of the Ontario Act. /// LES CONFLITS DE travail et les revendications sociales pendant et immédiatement après la Première guerre mondiale poussèrent la plupart des gouvernements provinciaux du Canada à adopter certaines lois régissant le salaire minimum des travailleuses dans des industries déterminées, après consultation avec les représentants des employeurs et des employées. Le salaire minimum était basé sur les moyens de subsistance nécessaires à une femme célibataire sans personne à charge et sans besoin d'économiser pour un congé de maladie, un congédiement, ou pour sa retraite. Quand la Commission du Salaire Minimum de l'Ontario, créée en 1920, insista pour que le salaire minimum constitue un véritable minimum, les employeurs n'eurent aucune objection à payer ce salaire ni à collaborer avec la commission. Pour s'assurer l'appui des employeurs, la commission leur fournit l'occasion d'exprimer leurs vues et eut tendance à accepter leurs recommandations plutôt que celles des travailleurs(euses). La justification pour les lois du salaire minimum des femmes ne reposaient pas sur le droit des travailleuses à un salaire raisonnable mais plutôt sur les besoins spécifiques des femmes en tant que mères des générations à venir; ce fut l'attitude adoptée par la Commission du Salaire Minimum de l'Ontario dans l'administration de la législation sur le salaire féminin.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28