Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

North of the Colour Line: Sleeping Car Porters and the Battle against Jim Crow on Canadian Rails, 1880-1920

Sarah-Jane (Saje) Mathieu
Labour / Le Travail
Vol. 47 (Spring, 2001), pp. 9-41
DOI: 10.2307/25149112
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25149112
Page Count: 33
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
North of the Colour Line: Sleeping Car Porters and the Battle against Jim Crow on Canadian Rails, 1880-1920
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper analyses the evolution of Jim Crow employment patterns in the Canadian railway industry from the 1880s to World War I. It presents race as a central organizing principle in employers' decision to hire black railwaymen for their sleeping and dining car departments. Canadian railway managers actively sought out African American, West Indian, and African Canadian labour, believing that they constituted an easily manipulated group of workers. White railroaders fought the introduction of black employees, arguing that they undermined white manhood and railway unionism. Trade union leaders demanded and won a racialized division of the workforce, locking black workers into low-waged service position when they had initially enjoyed a broader range of employment options. In effect, white railway trade unionists and their employers embraced segregation as a rational model for peaceful working conditions. Black railroaders, on the other hand, resisted the encroachment of segregationist policies by forming their own union, the Order of Sleeping Car Porters. They pressured for change by exposing the scope of Jim Crow practices in the railway industry and trade unionism. /// Cet article analysE l'évolution des modèles d'emploi de Jim Crow dans l'industrie des chemins de fer canadiens des années 1880 jusqu'à la Première Guerre Mondiale. Il présente la race comme un principe fondamental dans la décision des employeurs d'embaucher des travailleurs noirs pour les wagons-lits et les wagons-restaurants. Les chefs des chemins de fer canadiens recherchaient activement les Afro-Américains, les Antillais et les Afro-Canadiens, en pensant qu'ils faisaient partie d'un groupe de travailleurs faciles à manipuler. Les travailleurs blancs se sont battus contre l'embauche des employés noirs, en disant que ces derniers saperaient leur virilité et le syndicalisme aux chemins de fer. Les chefs des syndicats ont demandé et gagné une séparation de la main-d'oeuvre selon la race, confinant les travailleurs noirs aux emplois peu rémunérés alors qu'ils avaient initialement une gamme de possibilités d'emploi plus variée. En effet, les syndicalistes blancs et les employeurs ont soutenu la ségrégation comme modèle rationnel des conditions de travail pacifiques. Les travailleurs noirs, en revanche, ont résisté aux politiques de ségrégation en formant leur propre syndicat, l'Ordre des travailleurs de wagons-lits. Ils ont fait des pressions pour obtenir des changements en rendant publiques les pratiques de Jim Crow dans l'industrie des chemins de fer et dans le mouvement syndical.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[9]
    [9]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41