Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Neither 'Primitives' nor 'Others,' but Somehow Not Quite like 'Us': The Fortunes of Psychic Unity and Essentialism in Chinese Studies

Miranda Brown
Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient
Vol. 49, No. 2 (2006), pp. 219-252
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25165140
Page Count: 34
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($34.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Neither 'Primitives' nor 'Others,' but Somehow Not Quite like 'Us': The Fortunes of Psychic Unity and Essentialism in Chinese Studies
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper re-evaluates a persistent but controversial claim in studies of China-to wit, that Chinese thought exhibited a different logical structure than that found in Europe. By situating what is now largely regarded as a Sinological problem within the broader context of the debate between Edward B. Tylor (1832-1917) and Lucien Lévy-Bruhl (1857-1939) about primitive thought, it argues that this line of inquiry about cultural difference, as exemplified by the work of its earliest exponents, Marcel Granet (1884-1940), Joseph Needham (1900-1995), and Angus Charles Graham (1919-1991), is still significant. The significance of these works lies not so much in their specific arguments about China as in the general approach they suggest for explaining cultural difference, an approach that can steer clear of the dangers in evolutionary and essentializing approaches to the study of human mentality. /// Dans cet article j'examine de nouveau une prétension persistante mais controversée dans les études de la Chine-c'est à dire, que la pensée chinoise fait preuve d'une différente structure logique que celle trouvée en Europe. En situant ce qui est principalement regardé comme un problème sinologique dans le contexte plus large d'un débat entre Edward B. Tylor (1832-1917) et Lucien Lévy-Bruhl (1857-1939) sur la pensée primitive, j'affirme la signifiance actuelle de cette approche de la différence culturelle, telle que représentée par les écrits de ses premíers partisans, Marcel Granet (1884-1940), Joseph Needham (1900-1995) et Angus Charles Graham (1919-1991). La signifiance de ces ouvrages dérive moins de leurs arguments spécifiques sur la Chine, que de leur approche générale de l'explication de la différence culturelle, une approche qui peut éviter les dangers des approches évolutionnaires et réductionnistes de l'étude des mentalités humaines.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[219]
    [219]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231
  • Thumbnail: Page 
232
    232
  • Thumbnail: Page 
233
    233
  • Thumbnail: Page 
234
    234
  • Thumbnail: Page 
235
    235
  • Thumbnail: Page 
236
    236
  • Thumbnail: Page 
237
    237
  • Thumbnail: Page 
238
    238
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244
  • Thumbnail: Page 
245
    245
  • Thumbnail: Page 
246
    246
  • Thumbnail: Page 
247
    247
  • Thumbnail: Page 
248
    248
  • Thumbnail: Page 
249
    249
  • Thumbnail: Page 
250
    250
  • Thumbnail: Page 
251
    251
  • Thumbnail: Page 
252
    252