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Life and Teleology: Kant's Critical-Teleological Philosophy and Contemporary Biology

Israel Idalovichi
Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie
Vol. 23, No. 1 (1992), pp. 85-103
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25170921
Page Count: 19
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Life and Teleology: Kant's Critical-Teleological Philosophy and Contemporary Biology
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Abstract

A comprehensive definition of the phenomenon called "life" led to the addition of many dimensions to the natural sciences, and especially the conscious mental dimension. Historical attention is paid not only to those employing the natural philosophical paradigms, but also to evolutionary theories and to the Kantian teleological philosophy. The belief that science can solve the riddle of life is a category of purposal thinking. A revised version of critical teleology is essential for comprehension of life.

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