Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Is There a Universal Log Law for Turbulent Wall-Bounded Flows?

William K. George
Philosophical Transactions: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Vol. 365, No. 1852, Scaling and Structure in High Reynolds Number Wall-Bounded Flows (Mar. 15, 2007), pp. 789-806
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25190469
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Is There a Universal Log Law for Turbulent Wall-Bounded Flows?
Preview not available

Abstract

The history and theory supporting the idea of a universal log law for turbulent wall-bounded flows are briefly reviewed. The original idea of justifying a log law from a constant Reynolds stress layer argument is found to be deficient. By contrast, it is argued that the logarithmic friction law and velocity profiles derived from matching inner and outer profiles for a pipe or channel flow are well-founded and consistent with the data. But for a boundary layer developing along a flat plate it is not, and in fact it is a power law theory that seems logically consistent. Even so, there is evidence for at least an empirical logarithmic fit to the boundary-friction data, which is indistinguishable from the power law solution. The value of κ ≈ 0.38 obtained from a logarithmic curve fit to the boundary-layer velocity data, however, does not appear to be the same as for pipe flow for which 0.43 appears to be the best estimate. Thus, the idea of a universal log law for wall-bounded flows is not supported by either the theory or the data.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
789
    789
  • Thumbnail: Page 
790
    790
  • Thumbnail: Page 
791
    791
  • Thumbnail: Page 
792
    792
  • Thumbnail: Page 
793
    793
  • Thumbnail: Page 
794
    794
  • Thumbnail: Page 
795
    795
  • Thumbnail: Page 
796
    796
  • Thumbnail: Page 
797
    797
  • Thumbnail: Page 
798
    798
  • Thumbnail: Page 
799
    799
  • Thumbnail: Page 
800
    800
  • Thumbnail: Page 
801
    801
  • Thumbnail: Page 
802
    802
  • Thumbnail: Page 
803
    803
  • Thumbnail: Page 
804
    804
  • Thumbnail: Page 
805
    805
  • Thumbnail: Page 
806
    806