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The Labor Market Effects of Immigration

George E. Johnson
Industrial and Labor Relations Review
Vol. 33, No. 3 (Apr., 1980), pp. 331-341
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/2522570
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2522570
Page Count: 11
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The Labor Market Effects of Immigration
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Abstract

This paper is a theoretical examination of the probable effects on the U.S. labor market of a continued high rate of illegal immigration. The author constructs a model to estimate the impact each additional immigrant has on the employment of the domestic population, on GNP, and on the distribution of income. The model suggests that in non-recessionary periods the most important effect of a high rate of immigration is on the wage rates of low-skilled labor rather than on the employment of low-skilled native workers, but immigration also increases the earnings of high-skilled workers and the owners of capital. In the very long run, the author concludes, this redistribution of income will be offset to some extent by increases in the supplies of skilled labor and capital.

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