Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Married Women in Part-Time Employment

James E. Long and Ethel B. Jones
ILR Review
Vol. 34, No. 3 (Apr., 1981), pp. 413-425
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/2522788
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2522788
Page Count: 13
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Married Women in Part-Time Employment
Preview not available

Abstract

This research deals with three aspects of the part-time employment pattern of working wives: (1) the wives' characteristics, (2) the level and structure of their earnings in part-time jobs, and (3) the duration of their employment when part-time jobs are available to them. This study improves upon previous research by using multivariate analysis to determine if the variation in the incidence of part-time work consistently found in other studies persists when earnings potential, fertility, family income, and other factors that may vary by age or race are held constant. It differs further by including a data source that contains direct measures of market wages and experience for a large sample of married working women. The authors find that husband's income, family size, and the wife's health, race, and previous work experience are among the variables that influence the probability that the wife works part time. They also find that the level of wages and returns to some investments in human capital are relatively lower in the part-time labor market but that there are similarities between the earnings structure of part-time and full-time jobs. They conclude that part-time work opportunities appear to increase the length of the working life of married women.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
413
    413
  • Thumbnail: Page 
414
    414
  • Thumbnail: Page 
415
    415
  • Thumbnail: Page 
416
    416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418
  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425