Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Male-Female Differences in Hourly Wages: The Role of Human Capital, Working Conditions, and Housework

Joni Hersch
Industrial and Labor Relations Review
Vol. 44, No. 4 (Jul., 1991), pp. 746-759
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
DOI: 10.2307/2524461
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2524461
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($40.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Male-Female Differences in Hourly Wages: The Role of Human Capital, Working Conditions, and Housework
Preview not available

Abstract

This study uses a new data set from a 1986 survey of workers to examine simultaneously the wage effects of human capital, household responsibilities, working conditions, and on-the-job training. The analysis suggests that household responsibilities had a negative effect on women's earnings, but the unexplained difference between the earnings of men and women is not greatly reduced by inclusion in the explanatory model of information on either housework or working conditions. The presence of children appears to have had a positive effect on the wages of both men and women.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
746
    746
  • Thumbnail: Page 
747
    747
  • Thumbnail: Page 
748
    748
  • Thumbnail: Page 
749
    749
  • Thumbnail: Page 
750
    750
  • Thumbnail: Page 
751
    751
  • Thumbnail: Page 
752
    752
  • Thumbnail: Page 
753
    753
  • Thumbnail: Page 
754
    754
  • Thumbnail: Page 
755
    755
  • Thumbnail: Page 
756
    756
  • Thumbnail: Page 
757
    757
  • Thumbnail: Page 
758
    758
  • Thumbnail: Page 
759
    759