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Biometry in the Third World: Science not Ritual

D. A. Preece
Biometrics
Vol. 40, No. 2 (Jun., 1984), pp. 519-523
DOI: 10.2307/2531406
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2531406
Page Count: 5
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Biometry in the Third World: Science not Ritual
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Abstract

The author's experience, particularly with agricultural experimentation, has persuaded him that Third-World countries suffer badly from a lack of biometric expertise. Badly designed, unsatisfactorily run and unsoundly analysed agricultural experiments are common. An abstract mathematical approach to statistics is partly to blame, with a `cookbook' approach to both design and analysis. Statistical `recipes' are followed blindly, and ritual has taken over from scientific thinking. But the Third World can hardly be blamed for its imported biometric rituals if these are perceived as appropriate in scientific work in developed countries.

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