Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Studies Of Carbohydrate And Lipid Metabolism In Women Developing Hypertension On Oral Contraceptives

Bridgett Mason, Nigel Oakley and Victor Wynn
The British Medical Journal
Vol. 3, No. 5875 (Aug. 11, 1973), pp. 317-320
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25420951
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Studies Of Carbohydrate And Lipid Metabolism In Women Developing Hypertension On Oral Contraceptives
Preview not available

Abstract

Metabolic studies in 100 women developing hypertension on combined oestrogen-progestogen oral contraceptives have been compared with similar studies in normotensive women on oral contraceptives, matched for age and duration of contraceptive use, and in women not taking contraceptives. The metabolic changes known to be induced by oral contraceptives-impaired glucose tolerance, elevated blood pyruvate levels, and raised serum lipid concentrations-were found to be exaggerated in the matched hypertensive group, largely due to pronounced abnormalities in 33 subjects with diastolic blood pressures over 110 mm Hg. Women developing severe hypertension were older, more obese, and of higher parity than those with mild hypertension and there was a high incidence of previous toxaemia of pregnancy in the hypertensive group. The results show that in women on oral contraceptives changes in blood pressure and in metabolic functions tend to be correlated with one another, and are consistent with the hypothesis that oral contraception induces a primary biochemical effect whose expression in the individual is determined by intrinsic factors including genetic constitution, age, weight, and parity.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
317
    317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
319
    319
  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320