Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Allosteric Regulation of an Essential Trypanosome Polyamine Biosynthetic Enzyme by a Catalytically Dead Homolog

Erin K. Willert, Richard Fitzpatrick and Margaret A. Phillips
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 104, No. 20 (May 15, 2007), pp. 8275-8280
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25427660
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Allosteric Regulation of an Essential Trypanosome Polyamine Biosynthetic Enzyme by a Catalytically Dead Homolog
Preview not available

Abstract

African sleeping sickness is a fatal disease that is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Polyamine biosynthesis is an essential pathway in the parasite and is a validated drug target for treatment of the disease. s-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) catalyzes a key step in polyamine biosynthesis. Here, we show that trypanosomatids uniquely contain both a functional AdoMetDC and a paralog designated prozyme that has lost catalytic activity. The T. brucei prozyme forms a high-affinity heterodimer with AdoMetDC that stimulates its activity by 1,200-fold. Both genes are expressed in T. brucei, and analysis of AdoMetDC activity in T. brucei extracts supports the finding that the heterodimer is the functional enzyme in vivo. Thus, prozyme has evolved to be a catalytically dead but allosterically active subunit of AdoMetDC, providing an example of how regulators of multimeric enzymes can evolve through gene duplication and mutational drift. These data identify a distinct mechanism for regulating AdoMetDC in the parasite that suggests new strategies for the development of parasite-specific inhibitors of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
8275
    8275
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8276
    8276
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8277
    8277
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8278
    8278
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8279
    8279
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8280
    8280