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Low-Cholesterol Diet: Enhancement Of Effect Of Cdca In Patients With Gall Stones

D. P. Maudgal, R. Bird, W. S. Blackwood and T. C. Northfield
The British Medical Journal
Vol. 2, No. 6141 (Sep. 23, 1978), pp. 851-853
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25429187
Page Count: 3
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Low-Cholesterol Diet: Enhancement Of Effect Of Cdca In Patients With Gall Stones
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Abstract

Fifteen patients with gall stones who were taking chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) 15 mg/kg at bedtime participated in two separate experiments to investigate the effects of altering sterol intake on the cholesterol saturation index (SI) of fasting gall-bladder bile. In experiment I the 15 patients on an unrestricted diet had a SI of 0·87±0·04 (mean ± SE of mean), which fell to 0·75 ±0·04 after one week in hospital on a diet of 100 mg cholesterol daily. In experiment II seven of the patients were given four different dietary regimens lasting one month each in random order as outpatients. On a diet of 600 mg of cholesterol daily the mean SI was 0·72±0·05, which fell to 0·67±0·05 when the patients were put on a 100 mg cholesterol diet. The addition of plant sterols (3 g daily) to both diets raised the mean SIs to 0·80±0·05 and 0·77±0·05 respectively. The percentage CDCA in bile was unaffected by alterations in the cholesterol and plant sterol intakes. We conclude that a low-cholesterol diet but not a high intake of plant sterols enhances the effect of CDCA in patients with gall stones.

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