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Examining the Vividness Controversy: An Availability-Valence Interpretation

Jolita Kisielius and Brian Sternthal
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 12, No. 4 (Mar., 1986), pp. 418-431
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/254302
Page Count: 14
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Examining the Vividness Controversy: An Availability-Valence Interpretation
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Abstract

The effect of vividness on attitudinal judgments is a controversial issue. Experimental evidence indicates that vividness often has no effect on attitudinal judgments; however, there is also evidence that vividness can enhance or undermine the favorableness of attitudinal judgments. In this article, the authors introduce the availability-valence hypothesis to predict and explain the effects of vividness and to account for the frequent observation of a null effect.

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