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Assessing Attribute Importance: A Comparison of Six Methods

James Jaccard, David Brinberg and Lee J. Ackerman
Journal of Consumer Research
Vol. 12, No. 4 (Mar., 1986), pp. 463-468
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/254305
Page Count: 6
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Assessing Attribute Importance: A Comparison of Six Methods
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Abstract

Six methods of measuring attribute importance were evaluated for convergent validity. The methods were (1) an open-ended elicitation approach, (2) an information-search approach based on Jacoby's behavioral process technology, (3) direct ratings of importance, (4) conjoint measurement, (5) indices based on Jaccard's subjective probability approach, and (6) a paired comparison approach. The convergent validity of importance methods was investigated for two product classes: birth control and cars. Results indicated relatively low levels of convergence among measures.

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