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Microfluidic System for On-Chip High-Throughput Whole-Animal Sorting and Screening at Subcellular Resolution

Christopher B. Rohde, Fei Zeng, Ricardo Gonzalez-Rubio, Matthew Angel and Mehmet Fatih Yanik
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 104, No. 35 (Aug. 28, 2007), pp. 13891-13895
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25436592
Page Count: 5
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Abstract

We report a suite of key microfluidic devices for complex high-throughput whole-animal genetic and drug screens. We demonstrate a high-speed microfluidic sorter that can isolate and immobilize Caenorhabditis elegans in a well defined geometry for screening phenotypic features at subcellular resolution in physiologically active animals. We show an integrated chip containing individually addressable screening-chamber devices for incubation and exposure of individual animals to biochemical compounds and high-resolution time-lapse imaging of many animals on a single chip without the need for anesthesia. We describe a design for delivery of compound libraries in standard multiwell plates to microfluidic devices and also for rapid dispensing of screened animals into multiwell plates. When used in various combinations, these devices will facilitate a variety of high-throughput assays using whole animals, including mutagenesis and RNAi and drug screens at subcellular resolution, as well as high-throughput high-precision manipulations such as femtosecond laser microsurgery for large-scale in vivo neural degeneration and regeneration studies.

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