Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Randomised Study Of Effect Of Different Doses Of Vitamin A On Childhood Morbidity And Mortality

Christine Stabell Benn, Cesario Martins, Amabelia Rodrigues, Henrik Jensen, Ida Maria Lisse and Peter Aaby
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 331, No. 7530 (Dec. 17, 2005), pp. 1428-1430
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25455676
Page Count: 3
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Randomised Study Of Effect Of Different Doses Of Vitamin A On Childhood Morbidity And Mortality
Preview not available

Abstract

Objectives To determine whether the dose of vitamin A currently recommended by the World Health Organization or half this dose gives better protection against childhood morbidity and mortality. Design Randomised study. Setting A combined oral polio vaccine and vitamin A supplementation campaign in Guinea-Bissau, Africa. Participants 4983 children aged 6 months to 5 years. Interventions One of two doses of vitamin A (recommended and half); oral polio vaccine. Main outcome measures Mortality and morbidity at six and nine months. Results Mortality was lower in the children who took half the recommended dose of vitamin A compared with the full dose at both six months (mortality rate ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.36 to 1.35) and nine months (0.62, 0.36 to 1.06) of follow-up. There was a significant interaction between sex and dose, the lower dose being associated with significantly reduced mortality in girls (0.19, 0.06 to 0.66) but not in boys (1.98, 0.74 to 5.29). The lower dose of vitamin A was consistently associated with lower hospital case fatality in girls (0.19, 0.02 to 1.45). Paradoxically, in children aged 6-18 months, the low dose was associated with slightly higher morbidity. Conclusions Half the dose of vitamin A currently recommended by WHO may provide equally good or better protection against mortality but not against morbidity.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1428
    1428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1429
    1429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1430
    1430