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Drugs

Ethan Nadelmann
Foreign Policy
No. 162 (Sep. - Oct., 2007), pp. 24-26, 28, 30
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25462207
Page Count: 5
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Drugs
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Abstract

Prohibition has failed-again. Instead of treating the demand for illegal drugs as a market, and addicts as patients, policymakers the world over have boosted the profits of drug lords and fostered narcostates that would frighten Al Capone. Finally, a smarter drug control regime that values reality over rhetoric is rising to replace the "war" on drugs.

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