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Neurogenesis and Widespread Forebrain Migration of Distinct GABAergic Neurons from the Postnatal Subventricular Zone

Dragos Inta, Julieta Alfonso, Jakob von Engelhardt, Maria M. Kreuzberg, Axel H. Meyer, Johannes A. van Hooft and Hannah Monyer
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 105, No. 52 (Dec. 30, 2008), pp. 20994-20999
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25465021
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Neurogenesis and Widespread Forebrain Migration of Distinct GABAergic Neurons from the Postnatal Subventricular Zone
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Abstract

Most forebrain GABAergic interneurons in rodents are born during embryonic development in the ganglionic eminences (GE) and migrate tangentially into the cortical plate. A subset, however, continues to be generated postnatally in the subventricular zone (SVZ). These interneurons populate the olfactory bulb (OB) reached via migration in the rostral migratory stream (RMS). Employing transgenic mice expressing EGFP in 5-HT₃-positive neurons, we identified additional migratory pathways in the early postnatal brain. Time-lapse imaging experiments revealed massive migration of EGFP-positive cells from the SVZ into numerous forebrain regions, including cortex, striatum, and nucleus accumbens. The neuronal fate of the migratory EGFP-labeled cells was indicated by their doublecortin (DCX) expression. Birthdating experiments, by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and retrovirus-based experiments, provided evidence that migrating neuroblasts were born in the SVZ postnatally and developed a distinct GABAergic phenotype. Our results demonstrate that the SVZ is a reservoir of GABAergic interneurons not only for the OB, but also for other cortical and subcortical areas.

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