Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Social Capital and the Adaptation of the Second Generation: The Case of Vietnamese Youth in New Orleans

Min Zhou and Carl L. Bankston III
The International Migration Review
Vol. 28, No. 4, Special Issue: The New Second Generation (Winter, 1994), pp. 821-845
DOI: 10.2307/2547159
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2547159
Page Count: 25
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($26.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Social Capital and the Adaptation of the Second Generation: The Case of Vietnamese Youth in New Orleans
Preview not available

Abstract

This article investigates some of the ways in which social capital made available in an immigrant community contributes to, rather than hinders, the adaptation of the younger generation, in school and after-ward. We contrast the assimilationist view with alternative arguments on ethnic resources as social capital. Based on a case study of Vietnamese youth in an immigrant community in eastern New Orleans, we explore how aspects of an immigrant culture serve as a form of social capital to affect the adaptational experiences of immigrant offspring. We have found that students who have strong adherence to traditional family values, strong commitment to a work ethic, and a high degree of personal involvement in the ethnic community tend disproportionately to receive high grades, to have definite college plans, and to score high on academic orientation. These values and behavioral and associational patterns are consistent with the expectations of their community and reflect a high level of social integration among Vietnamese youth. The findings indicate that strong positive immigrant cultural orientations can serve as a form of social capital that promotes value conformity and constructive forms of behavior, which provide otherwise disadvantaged children with an adaptive advantage. We conclude that social capital is crucial and, under certain conditions, more important than traditional human capital for the successful adaptation of younger-generation immigrants.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
821
    821
  • Thumbnail: Page 
822
    822
  • Thumbnail: Page 
823
    823
  • Thumbnail: Page 
824
    824
  • Thumbnail: Page 
825
    825
  • Thumbnail: Page 
826
    826
  • Thumbnail: Page 
827
    827
  • Thumbnail: Page 
828
    828
  • Thumbnail: Page 
829
    829
  • Thumbnail: Page 
830
    830
  • Thumbnail: Page 
831
    831
  • Thumbnail: Page 
832
    832
  • Thumbnail: Page 
833
    833
  • Thumbnail: Page 
834
    834
  • Thumbnail: Page 
835
    835
  • Thumbnail: Page 
836
    836
  • Thumbnail: Page 
837
    837
  • Thumbnail: Page 
838
    838
  • Thumbnail: Page 
839
    839
  • Thumbnail: Page 
840
    840
  • Thumbnail: Page 
841
    841
  • Thumbnail: Page 
842
    842
  • Thumbnail: Page 
843
    843
  • Thumbnail: Page 
844
    844
  • Thumbnail: Page 
845
    845