If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

From le Moko to le Pew: Pépé's Transmogrifications

Edward Ousselin
The French Review
Vol. 77, No. 5 (Apr., 2004), pp. 902-911
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25479532
Page Count: 10
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
From le Moko to le Pew: Pépé's Transmogrifications
Preview not available

Abstract

Julien Duvivier's 1937 film, Pépé le Moko, was not only remade twice by Hollywood-into Algiers (1938) and Casbah (1946)-it also inspired the creation of a cartoon character, Pepe le Pew, which over time became better known than its satirical sources, and which incorporated all the well-known negative stereotypes of France and the French. In the successive remakes and adaptations, the processes of alterity, subordination, and feminization shifted from the Algerian to the French characters, contributing to an amalgamation of Frenchness with a form of exoticism or Orientalism within American popular culture.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
902
    902
  • Thumbnail: Page 
903
    903
  • Thumbnail: Page 
904
    904
  • Thumbnail: Page 
905
    905
  • Thumbnail: Page 
906
    906
  • Thumbnail: Page 
907
    907
  • Thumbnail: Page 
908
    908
  • Thumbnail: Page 
909
    909
  • Thumbnail: Page 
910
    910
  • Thumbnail: Page 
911
    911