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Perceived Behavioral Integrity: Relationships with Employee Attitudes, Well-Being, and Absenteeism

David J. Prottas
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 81, No. 2 (Aug., 2008), pp. 313-322
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25482216
Page Count: 10
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Perceived Behavioral Integrity: Relationships with Employee Attitudes, Well-Being, and Absenteeism
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Abstract

Relationships between the behavioral integrity of managers as perceived by employees and employee attitudes (job satisfaction and life satisfaction), well-being (stress and health), and behaviors (absenteeism) were tested using data from the 2002 National Study of the Changing Workforce (n = 2,820). Using multivariate and univariate analysis, perceived behavioral integrity (PBI) was positively related to job and life satisfaction and negatively related to stress, poor health, and absenteeism. The effect size for the relationship with job satisfaction was medium-to-large while the effect sizes with respect to the other variables were small-to-medium. There was no support for the hypotheses that women would perceive lower levels of behavioral integrity and that the strength of the relationships between PBI and the outcomes variables would be stronger among women than among men.

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