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The Influence of Perceived Importance of an Ethical Issue on Moral Judgment, Moral Obligation, and Moral Intent

Russell Haines, Marc D. Street and Douglas Haines
Journal of Business Ethics
Vol. 81, No. 2 (Aug., 2008), pp. 387-399
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25482221
Page Count: 13
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The Influence of Perceived Importance of an Ethical Issue on Moral Judgment, Moral Obligation, and Moral Intent
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Abstract

The study extends and tests the issue contingent four-component model of ethical decision-making to include moral obligation. A web-based questionnaire was used to gauge the influence of perceived importance of an ethical issue on moral judgment and moral intent. Perceived importance of an ethical issue was found to be a predictor of moral judgment but not of moral intent as predicted. Moral obligation is suggested to be a process that occurs after a moral judgment is made and explained a significant portion of the variance in moral intent.

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