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Early Mainland Residues in Southern Hiberno-English

Roger Lass
Irish University Review
Vol. 20, No. 1, The English of the Irish: Special Issue (Spring, 1990), pp. 137-148
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25484343
Page Count: 12
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Notes and References

This item contains 36 references.

[Footnotes]
  • 1
    Roger Lass, The shape of English: structure and history (London: J. M. Dent, 1987), § 5.8
  • 2
    Manfred Görlach, "Colonial lag? The alleged conservative character of American English and other 'colonial' varieties", African Studies 46 (1987), 179-98.
  • 3
    Lass, Shape, § 5.7.1.
  • 4
    John Harris, "On doing comparative reconstruction with genetically unrelated languages", in A. G. Ramat, O. Carruba, G. Bernini (editors), Papers from the 7th International Conference on Historical Linguistics (Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1987), pp. 267-82.
  • 5
    Accents of English (3 vols,, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982).
  • 7
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Roger Lass, "Where do Extraterritorial Englishes come from? Dialect input and recodification in transported Englishes", in Sylvia Adamson and Susan Wright (editors), Papers from the 5th International Conference on English Historical Linguistics (Amsterdam: Benjamins, to appear).
    • Roger Lass & Susan Wright, "Endogeny vs. contact: 'Afrikaans influence' on South African English", English World-Wide 7 (1986), 201-24.
  • 8
    Lass. Shape § 5.7.2
  • 9
    A. Bliss, "English in the South of Ireland", in Peter Trudgill (editor), Language in the British Isles (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984), p.35.
  • 10
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • H. C. Wyld, A short history of modern colloquial English, 3rd ed. (Oxford: Blackwell, 1936), pp. 240ff.
    • Roger Lass, "Phonology and morphology", in R. Lass (editor), The Cambridge History of the English Language, III: 1476-1776 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, To Appear), § 4.1.2 (Henceforth CHEL III).
  • 12
    Roger Lass, English phonology and phonological theory: synchronie and diachronic studies (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976), chapter 4.
  • 13
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Wyld, Short history, pp. 197ff
    • Helge Kökeritz, Shakespeare's pronunciation (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1953), pp. 162ff.
  • 14
    Alexander Hume, The Orthographie and congruitie of the Britan tongue, edited by H. B. Wheatley (1865), EETS OS 5.
  • 15
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • John Wallis, Grammatica linguae anglicanae, 6th ed. (London: William Bowyer, 1653), p. 9.
    • Roger Lass, "How early did English get modern? Or, what happens when you listen to orthoepists and not to historians", Diachronica, 6.1 (1989), 75-110.
  • 17
    Christopher Cooper, The English teacher (London: The Author, 1687), p.4.
  • 18
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Mather Flint, Prononciation de la langue Angloise (Paris, 1740)
    • Helge Kökeritz, "Mather Flint on early eighteenth-century English pronunciation", Skrifta Utgivna af Kungl. Humanistiska Vetenskapsamfundet i Uppsala 37 (1944).
  • 19
    Richard Hodges, The English primrose (London: Cotes, 1644).
  • 20
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • F. MacÉinri, "An Irish English vowel system", Paper read at the 8th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences
    • Wells, Accents, § 5.3.4.
  • 21
    Thomas Sheridan, A rhetorical grammar of the English language (Dublin: Price, Whitestone, 1780).
  • 22
    W. Benzie, The Dublin orator: Thomas Sheridan's influence on eighteenth-century rhetoric and Belles Lettres (Leeds: University of Leeds, School of English, 1972).
  • 23
    This reference contains 3 citations:
    • John Walker, A critical pronouncing dictionary and expositor of the English language (London: G.G.J. & J. Robinson, 1791).
    • Walker has a margina] distinction (p. 29)
    • Lass, CHEL III, ß 4.3.2. (iv).
  • 24
    This reference contains 3 citations:
    • Wells, Accents, § 3.1.6.
    • John Harris, Phonological variation and change: studies in Hiberno-English (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985).
    • Lass, CHEL III, 8 4.2.3.
  • 26
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • S. Bertz, Der Dubliner Stadtdialekt. Eine synchronische Beschreibung der Struktur und Variabilität des heutigen Dubliner Englischen (Doctoral Dissertation, Universität Freiberg im Breisgau, 1975).
    • Wells, Accents, 3.1.6, 5.3.5-6,
  • 27
    Thomas Batchelor, An Orthoepie analysis of the English language (London: Didier & Tebett, 1809).
  • 28
    A. J. Ellis, On Early English pronunciation, with special reference to Shakespere and Chaucer, Part IV (London: Asher, 1874), pp. 1108ff.
  • 29
    Wells, Accents, § 5.3.5.
  • 30
    Wells, Accents, §§ 3.2.2f
  • 31
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • A.A. Hill, "Early loss of r before dentals", PMLA 55 (1940), 308-57
    • M. V/indross, R-Metathesis and early R-loss in English and Dutch: a diachronic approach (Leuven: Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department Linguistiek, 1988).
  • 32
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Walker, Dictionary, p. 50
    • ibid
  • 33
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Ben Jonson, The English grammar (London, 1640), p. 47
    • Walker (p. 50)
  • 34
    Diarmuid Ó Sé, "Word-stress in Hiberno- English", in John Harris, David Little, David Singleton (editors), Perspectives on the English language in Ireland. Proceedings of the First Symposium on Hiberno-English (Dublin: CLCS, 1986), pp. 97-110.
  • 35
    This reference contains 3 citations:
    • Lass, Shape, § 3.6
    • Lass, CHEL 111,16
    • Lass, "Phonology and morphology", in N. F. Blake (editor), The Cambridge History of the English Language, II: 1066-1476 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, To appear), § 6.
  • 36
    Peter Levins, Manipulus vocabulorum (London, 1570). Edited by H. B. Wheatley (1867),EETSOS27.
  • 37
    Thomas Dyche, A guide to the English tongue (London: Butler, 1707).
  • 38
    Robert Nares, Elements of orthoepy (London: T. Payne & Son, 1784).
  • 39
    R. M. Hogg & C. B. McCully, Metrical phonology, a coursebook (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987), § 3.6.
  • 40
    This reference contains 2 citations:
    • Ó Sé, pp. 103ff
    • Lass & Wright (note 7 above).