If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

The Influence of the Cyclops Episode of Ulysses on the Jason Section of "The Sound and the Fury"

Lewis Layman
The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies
Vol. 13, No. 1 (Jun., 1987), pp. 61-74
DOI: 10.2307/25512681
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25512681
Page Count: 14
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
The Influence of the Cyclops Episode of Ulysses on the Jason Section of
Preview not available

Abstract

The correspondences between the Cyclops episode of Ulysses and the Jason section of "The Sound and the Fury" are too numerous to be coincidental. They indicate that Joyce's episode was a primary source for Faulkner in his composition of Jason's soliloquy. Faulkner's indebtedness to Joyce is evident in the use of an irate, unreliable narrator and in the rendering of a local dialect, which is simultaneously vital and deadening. The similarities include, not only themes such as the failure of love in the twentieth century, but also patterns of imagery of the crucifixion and of blindness. Both chapters function similarly in dramatizing a descent into the underworld of modern alienation. In subsequent sections both authors expolore whether ressurection is possible. /// Les correspondances entre l'épisode des Cyclopes d'Ulysse et la section Jason dans le livre "The Sound and The Fury" sont trop nombreuses pour être des coïncidences. Elles indiquent que l'épisode de Joyce fut une source primaire dans la composition du monologue de Jason. Faulkner est redevable à Joyce et ceci se voit dans l'usage d'un narrateur irrité et instable et dans l'interprétation d'un patois local qui est à la fois vital et aveulissant. Les ressemblances incluent non seulement des thèmes comme celui de la pénurie d'amour du 20e siècle, mais aussi les patrons imagés de la crucifixion et de la cécité. Les deux chapîtres fonctionnent pareillement en dramatisant une descente dans le monde sublumaire de l'aliénation moderne. Dans les sections suivantes les deux auteurs explorent l'existence de la résurrection.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74