Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

'The Real History of the ERA': Joyce, Lewis and Fascism

Ira B. Nadel
The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies
Vol. 14, No. 1 (Jul., 1988), pp. 29-35
DOI: 10.2307/25512723
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25512723
Page Count: 7
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
'The Real History of the ERA': Joyce, Lewis and Fascism
Preview not available

Abstract

The opposing responses to Fascism by Joyce and Wyndham Lewis provide the catalyst for a discussion of the literary impact of Fascism on two modernist writers. Two meanings of Fascism are used: first, as a political movement involving populist appeal and authoritarian rule; second, as an aesthetic imposing a political ideology on literary form. The fascistic nature of language, which Roland Barthes identified in 1977, extends this second usage. Focussing on the contradictory programme of Fascism's repression of freedom while it also celebrated artistic expression, the essay concentrates on Lewis' attraction to, and Joyce's repulsion from, European Fascism in the 1930's. The extreme reaction by Lewis to Joyce's "Work-in-Progress" is seen as a response to Joyce's rejection of monolithic Fascism for a political and literary pluralism. /// Les réactions contradictoires de Joyce et de Wyndham Lewis face au fascisme servent de catalystes à la discussion sur l'influence littéraire du fascisme sur deux auteurs modernistes. Deux interprétations du fascisme sont illustrées: la première, en tant que mouvement politique qui implique un intérêt populiste et un gouvernement autoritaine, la seconde en tant qu'esthétique imposant une idéologie politique á la forme littéraire. La nature fasciste de la langue, identifiée par Roland Barthes en 1977, diffuse cette dernière interprétation. Cet essai attire l'attention sur l'attrait ressenti par Lewis et la révulsion de Joyce face au fascisme dans les années 1930, en insistant sur son programme contradictoire qui réprime la liberté tout en célébrant l'expression artistique.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35