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Heaney, Carleton and Joyce on the Road to Lough Derg

Maureen Waters
The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies
Vol. 14, No. 1 (Jul., 1988), pp. 55-65
DOI: 10.2307/25512726
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25512726
Page Count: 11
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Heaney, Carleton and Joyce on the Road to Lough Derg
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Abstract

"Station Island" by Seamus Heaney is a sequence of poems describing a pilgrimage to Lough Derg in Donegal. Confronted by spirits of the dead, some of them murdered by Ulster gunmen, Heaney's pilgrim must try to acknowledge the "collective historical experience" without compromising his integrity as a poet. James Joyce and William Carleton appear to offer guidance, but their advice is contradictory. Meditating on the historic, artistic and personal differences between these two writers, Heaney brilliantly explores the central tensions of modern Ulster as well as the relation between the private and public worlds of the poet. Recognizing that he draws his strength, Antaeus-like, from his native soil, he ultimately rejects Joyce's dictum: "Let go, let fly, forget..." /// "Station Island" de Seamus Heaney est une série de douze poèmes qui décrit un pèlerinage à Lough Derg en Donegal. Confronté par les esprits des morts, certains assassinés par des terroristes de l'Ulster, le pèlerin d'Heaney doit reconnaître l'expérience collective de l'histoire sans compromettre l'intégrité du poète. James Joyce and William Carleton semblent offrir une ligne de conduit, mais leur conseils sont contradictoire. En méditant sur les différences historiques, artistiques, et personnelles entre ces deux écrivains, Heaney dèfinit brillament les tensions centrales de l'Ulster moderne ainsi que la relation entre les mondes privé et public du poète. Avouant qu'il tire sa force, comme Antaeus, de son sol natal, il rejette le maxime de Joyce: "Let go, let fly, forget."

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