Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Metaphor and Metonymy in James Joyce's "A Little Cloud" and Bryan MacMahon's "Exile's Return"

Earl G. Ingersoll
The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies
Vol. 16, No. 2 (Dec., 1990), pp. 27-35
DOI: 10.2307/25512825
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25512825
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Metaphor and Metonymy in James Joyce's "A Little Cloud" and Bryan MacMahon's "Exile's Return"
Preview not available

Abstract

Contemporary study of the gender implications of metaphor and metonymy may be applied to readings of two Irish short stories by James Joyce and Bryan MacMahon. In Joyce's "A Little Cloud" we see the privileging of the poetic and the male in the aspiration of characters who are trapped in the "feminine" or domestic, associated with realistic detail and the metonymic. In MacMahon's "Exile's Return" we see characters like Timothy Hannigan who are male and potent yet restrained by their failure to perceive metaphoricity. The "exile," Paddy Kinsella, in contrast, has "traveled" and as a result has been empowered by metaphor. Accordingly, he can discover his wife in her daughter and achieve a figurative fatherhood. /// On peut lire deux contes irlandaises de James Joyce et de Bryan MacMahon au contexte de l'étude contemporaine des implications pour genre de la metaphore et la metonynmie. Nous voyons en "A Little Cloud" de Joyce que la poetique et le male ont le privilege pour les characteres qui aspirent mais qui s'ont attrape dans la feminin, associaté avec les details realistes et la metonymie. Nous voyons en "Exile's Return" de MacMahon charactères comme Timothy Hannigan qui sont males et puissants mais qui sont limité par leur incapacité de s'apercevoir la metaphore. "L'exil," Paddy Kinsella, au contraire, est un voyageur et pour cette raison il a le pouvoir de la metaphore. En consequence il peut decouvrir sa femme en sa fille et acheve la paternité figurée.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[27]
    [27]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35