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The Discordant Voices of 'Security'

Robin Luckham
Development in Practice
Vol. 17, No. 4/5 (Aug., 2007), pp. 682-690
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. on behalf of Oxfam GB
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25548270
Page Count: 9
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The Discordant Voices of 'Security'
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Abstract

This article examines the links between development and 'security', situating these concepts within their philosophical and political contexts, particularly in relation to contemporary wars, including the 'war on terror', and the so-called 'securitisation' of development. The security of states does not necessarily ensure the security of their citizens, and the very concept of security is both complex and contested. The author provides a succinct summary of various interpretations of security - of states, collectivities, and individuals - showing how each is double-edged or ambivalent.

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