Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Reclaiming the Research Library: The Founding of the Council on Library Resources

Deanna B. Marcum
Libraries & Culture
Vol. 31, No. 1, Reading & Libraries I (Winter, 1996), pp. 113-124
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25548425
Page Count: 12
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Reclaiming the Research Library: The Founding of the Council on Library Resources
Preview not available

Abstract

The Council on Library Resources, a private operating foundation committed to addressing the problems of libraries, was formed in 1956 with funding from the Ford Foundation. This article describes the events leading up to the formation of the Council and its early years, focusing on the actions and ideas of a few influential scholars and librarians. Louis B. Wright's vision of the Council as an independent body setting the standards for research librarianship, while never fully realized, set the stage for the Council (under the direction of Verner Clapp and subsequent presidents) to help shape library services in the United States in the second half of this century.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[113]
    [113]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124