Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

YMCA Libraries on the Mexican Border, 1916

David M. Hovde
Libraries & Culture
Vol. 32, No. 1 (Winter, 1997), pp. 113-124
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25548492
Page Count: 12
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
YMCA Libraries on the Mexican Border, 1916
Preview not available

Abstract

The YMCA developed a library program for the troops on the Mexican border in 1916. The association based its program, in part, on the experience it had gained from providing libraries to the military since the Civil War. It also utilized the expertise of librarians from The New York Public Library. The libraries were not mere collections of tracts and other religious material. The collections were relevant to the region's history, culture, and environment, as well as works for the troops' education and entertainment. The American Library Association not only used this program as a model for its own library program in World War I, but also enlisted the services of the same librarians.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[113]
    [113]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124