Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Nutritive Values of Ammonium Bisulphate and Molassed Silages: III. Effects of Level of Ammonium Bisulphate Applied to Herbage on Silage Quality and Animal Performance

R. B. McCarrick, M. F. Maguire, D. B. R. Poole and T. A. Spillane
Irish Journal of Agricultural Research
Vol. 4, No. 2 (Oct., 1965), pp. 135-142
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25555369
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Nutritive Values of Ammonium Bisulphate and Molassed Silages: III. Effects of Level of Ammonium Bisulphate Applied to Herbage on Silage Quality and Animal Performance
Preview not available

Abstract

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of different levels of ammonium bisulphate applied to herbage on voluntary intake of the silage and on animal performance. Grass/clover herbages were used for all silages and beef bullocks were used as experimental animals. No other foods were fed with the silages. The quantity of ammonium bisulphate used in silage-making was directly related to the sulphur content of silage dry matter and was inversely related to voluntary intake of silage by the animals. Ammonium bisulphate silages caused acidosis, the severity of which depended on the intake of ammonium bisulphate and on the duration of feeding. It is suggested that the disturbance of the animal's acid-base equilibrium caused by the bisulphate ion is primarily responsible for the reduced feed intake. Liveweight performance of the animals was directly related to their voluntary intake of silage.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
135
    135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
136
    136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
137
    137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
138
    138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
139
    139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
140
    140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
141
    141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
142
    142