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Effects of Fertiliser N, Additives and Season on Silage Fermentation in Laboratory Silos

R. K. Wilson
Irish Journal of Agricultural Research
Vol. 8, No. 3 (Dec., 1969), pp. 307-318
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25555540
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effects of Fertiliser N, Additives and Season on Silage Fermentation in Laboratory Silos
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Abstract

Grass from a permanent pasture, fertilised with either 25 or 100 g (NH₄)₂SO₄/m² (50 or 200 lbN/acre) was ensiled in laboratory silos (capacity 600 g) at three dates with seven additive variations: control, formic acid (2.5, 3.0 and 3.5 litres/tonne), molasses (1 and 2%) and a sodium nitrite-hexamine mixture, in triplicate. Silages and effluents were examined after 100 days. Nine comparisons were made between farm and laboratory silages. The effects of different compaction pressures on laboratory silage were investigated. N increased herbage and silage CP and yield of DM, but decreased herbage WSC. Sodium nitrite-hexamine consistently gave poor silage. Formic acid and molasses produced satisfactory silage, but only with grass cut in September did they improve quality relative to the control. Molasses increased and formic acid decreased silage lactic acid. Effluent WSC losses were as high with formic acid as with molasses. Effluent losses were 3% and fermentation losses 9%. Silage additives are unnecessary with heavily fertilised grass except when silage is made from grass of very low WSC such as autumn-cut herbage. Similar silage was produced from the same pasture in laboratory and farm silos. Increasing compaction pressure in laboratory silos increased effluent slightly but did not affect silage quality.

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