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Nutritional Effects of Oxidised Lipids in Fresh and Stored Pig Diets

J. F. Connolly, T. A. Spillane, D. B. R. Poole and D. M. McAleese
Irish Journal of Agricultural Research
Vol. 9, No. 1 (Apr., 1970), pp. 39-58
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25555560
Page Count: 20
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Nutritional Effects of Oxidised Lipids in Fresh and Stored Pig Diets
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Abstract

A three-phase experiment with pigs investigated the nutritional effects of (a) newly harvested barley and (b) feedingstuffs subjected to prolonged storage. In all, 84 pigs were fed individually from age 7 to 8 weeks to age 18 to 22 weeks on various diets containing barley, fish meal, minerals and vitamins. No supplementary vitamin E or anti-oxidant was added to the diets. Diets B and D (newly harvested barley from different sources) and diets G and W (barley stored for 12 months) were fed in Phase 1. Copper (250 ppm) was added to each diet except W. Diets B, D and G were also fed in Phases 2 and 3 which began 100 and 206 days respectively after Phase 1 commenced. Control diets H and K were prepared, using the stored barley, at the beginning of Phases 2 and 3 respectively (i.e., the equivalent of diet G in Phase 1). High peroxides (55 meq/kg lipid) were found in the lipids of one sample of newly harvested barley. Diet D which was prepared from this sample had a high initial peroxide value (116 meq/kg). The peroxide value of diet W (diet G without Cu) did not rise during 13 weeks' storage while diets B, D and G increased in peroxide content to peak values (106, 175 and 127 meq/kg respectively) after different storage intervals (not longer than 10 weeks) and then gradually declined. Thus, lipid stability may be adversely affected by the addition of a pro-oxidant such as copper to pig diets. A slight rise in peroxide value occurred in rations H and K. The total reducing substances and α-tocopherol in rations B, D and G and the relative proportions of linoleic acid in the neutral lipids of these rations decreased during storage. The health and performance of the pigs were satisfactory during each of the three phases of the experiment. Haematological data showed no evidence of anaemia. There were no differences between groups in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities of the serum. The liver vitamin A storage levels in the pigs fed rations B, D and G decreased progressively from Phase 1 to Phase 2 to Phase 3. The decrease in dietary linoleic acid during storage was reflected by a decrease in linoleic acid deposition in the back fats. At autopsy no gross pathological changes that could be attributed to the treatments were noted. Histological examination of heart muscle and liver revealed no abnormalities. It is doubtful if toxicity from lipid peroxides would arise under practical farm feeding of live-stock, since it would be almost impossible under commercial conditions to formulate a practical diet containing a toxic level of lipid peroxides.

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