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Parasitological Investigations of Cattle Slurry during Its Production and Storage for Experimental Purposes

J. F. Moore
Irish Journal of Agricultural Research
Vol. 18, No. 2 (Aug., 1979), pp. 105-119
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25555935
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Parasitological Investigations of Cattle Slurry during Its Production and Storage for Experimental Purposes
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Abstract

The occurrence and survival of trichostrongyle nematodes, mainly Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora, in cattle slurry during its accumulation and storage are reported from a study of this material which was produced for experimental purposes. Two types, produced in the winters of 1976-77 and 1977-78, were investigated: (i) slurry from unroofed (1976-77 only) and roofed slatted floor units (ii) slurry from unroofed cubicles and stored in a dungstead. Both types were produced by cattle in their first winter (weanlings). Egg counts showed that untreated weanlings can void large numbers of trichostrongyle eggs into slurry during winter and early spring. Viable trichostrongyle contamination, though diminishing with time, can persist in cattle slurry for the entire wintering period (November-March). In some instances a few viable eggs were present at the end of May, representing an accumulation and storage time of 7 months. Egg and larval counts (the latter following incubation) were very variable, the larval counts in particular showing marked fluctuations. Such variations indicate the heterogeneity of stored slurry and illustrate the difficulty in assessing its potential for parasitic contamination.

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