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Effect of Milk Composition on Selected Properties of Spray-Dried High-Fat and Skim-Milk Powders

M. Twomey, M. K. Keogh, B. T. O'Kennedy, M. Auty and D. M. Mulvihill
Irish Journal of Agricultural and Food Research
Vol. 39, No. 1 (Jun., 2000), pp. 79-94
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25562374
Page Count: 16
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Effect of Milk Composition on Selected Properties of Spray-Dried High-Fat and Skim-Milk Powders
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Abstract

Milk powders (10 kg of high-fat and 60 kg of skim-milk powder) were produced under constant processing conditions from spring and autumn milks. The influence of seasonal variation in protein and solid-fat contents at 10 °C of these milks on selected properties of milk powders was determined. The free-fat content and the median particle size of high-fat milk powders were significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the protein content (linear relationship) and solid-fat content (non-linear relationship) of the milk but were not significantly affected by the lactose content nor the protein:lactose ratio. The other powder properties measured, particle span (the volume distribution relative to the median diameter), particle density, bulk density, vacuole volume and interstitial air were not significantly affected. There was a non-linear relationship between the median powder particle size and solid-fat content at 10 °C of the milks. There was no significant effect of milk composition on the skim-milk powder properties studied. However, the particle size and vacuole volume were influenced by the atomiser nozzle size used during drying. The data from this study show that it is possible to predict the free-fat content of high-fat milk powders, made under the same processing conditions, from the protein and solid-fat content of the milks used. This finding should make it possible to produce milk powders with suitable properties for use in milk chocolate manufacture.

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