Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Do Inaccuracies in Small Area Deprivation Analyses Matter?

Richard Reading and Stan Openshaw
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (1979-)
Vol. 47, No. 3 (Jun., 1993), pp. 238-241
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25567731
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Do Inaccuracies in Small Area Deprivation Analyses Matter?
Preview not available

Abstract

Objective-To assess the accuracy of computerised matching of postcode to enumeration district (ED) and to determine whether any mismatching reduces the validity of methods to distinguish socioeconomic differences in "small area" deprivation studies. Design-Computerised and manual matching of postcodes to EDs were compared and the census based Townsend deprivation score was compared with socioeconomic data on individual families. Setting-County of Northumberland, England, 1989. Subjects-Random sample of 301 families with a child aged less than 15 months. Main results-With computerised matching only 47% of postcodes were matched to the correct ED. Eighty per cent of the deprivation scores of the computer matched EDs, however, approximated (±2) to the deprivation score of the actual ED. When EDs were divided into quintiles according to the deprivation score, accurate manual matching showed that 75% of families in the most deprived EDs were classed as deprived compared with 4% in the most affluent EDs. With the inaccuracies introduced by computer matching of postcodes, the corresponding figures were 56% and 12% respectively. Conclusions-Computerised matching of postcodes to EDs is highly inaccurate, but this has little effect on the allocation of deprivation scores. The socioeconomic inequalities shown by the deprivation score are blunted, but not eradicated, by this mismatching.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[238]
    [238]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241