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Journal Article

Technology, Selection, and Training in Call Centers

Inge Sieben, Andries De Grip, Jessica Longen and Ole Sørensen
ILR Review
Vol. 62, No. 4, The Globalization of Service Work: Comparative Institutional Perspectives on Call Centers (Jul., 2009), pp. 553-572
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25594526
Page Count: 20
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Technology, Selection, and Training in Call Centers
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Abstract

This analysis of establishment-level call center survey data from 14 countries in 2003-2006 explores relationships among technology, selection, and training for both newly hired and more experienced workers. The findings suggest, consistent with the more generic literature, that information and communication technology (ICT) increased training investments. However, the effects on both training and informal learning in the first year differed by technology type. Workflow automation technologies had particularly strong influence on training demands for newly hired agents in call centers. In contrast, interaction automation technologies (such as interactive voice response and speech recognition) and enhanced interaction technologies (such as media blending, electronic customer relationship management, and web-enablement) only led to more ongoing training, and interaction automation technologies had a negative relationship with informal learning in the first year. The findings also suggest that call centers with high levels of ICT recruited a work force with higher returns to training.

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