Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Experimental West Nile Virus Infection in Aigamo Ducks, a Cross between Wild Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and Domestic Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var. domesticus)

Hiroaki Shirafuji, Katsushi Kanehira, Masanori Kubo, Tomoyuki Shibahara and Tsugihiko Kamio
Avian Diseases
Vol. 53, No. 2 (Jun., 2009), pp. 239-244
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25599101
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Experimental West Nile Virus Infection in Aigamo Ducks, a Cross between Wild Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and Domestic Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var. domesticus)
Preview not available

Abstract

Four 2-wk-old and four 4-wk-old aigamo ducks, a cross between wild and domestic ducks (Anas platyrhynchos and Anas platyrhynchos var. domesticus, respectively), were infected with the NY99 strain of West Nile virus (WNV) to investigate WNV's pathogenicity in aigamo ducks and the possibility that they could transmit WNV. In the group of infected 2-wk-old aigamo ducks (2w-infection group), all of the ducks ate and drank less and showed decreased activity, some showed ataxia, and one died. Meanwhile, the group of infected 4 wk olds (4w-infection group) showed no clinical signs during the experimental period. Viremia was observed in all of the ducks in both age groups. Peak viral titers in the three surviving members of the 2w-infection group were $10^{3.7}-10^{5.3}$ plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml serum; the peak was $10^{7.1}\ {\rm PFU}/{\rm ml}$ serum in the 2w duck that died from the infection. Peak viral titers in the 4w-infection group were $10^{4.1}-10^{4.9}\ {\rm PFU}/{\rm ml}$ serum. Viral shedding in the oral and/or cloacal cavity was observed in all four members of the 2w-infection group and in three of the four members of the 4w-infection group. These results suggest that WNV-infected aigamo ducks can transmit WNV. Although aigamo ducks are reared in East Asia, where WNV is an exotic pathogen, the virus could be introduced and spread there in the future; thus it is important to take precautions against an introduction, and measures to prevent infection to aigamo duck operations should be prepared. /// Cuatro patos aigamo de cuatro semanas de edad, que son una cruza entre patos silvestres y patos domésticos (Anas platyrhynchos y Anas platyrhynchos var. domesticus, respectivamente), fueron infectados con la cepa NY99 del virus del Oeste del Nilo para investigar su patogenicidad en estos patos y para determinar la posibilidad de que estas aves puedan transmitir dicho virus. En el grupo de patos aigamo infectados a las dos semanas de edad, todas las aves comieron y bebieron menos, mostraron una actividad disminuida, algunos mostraron ataxia y uno murió. Por su parte, el grupo infectado a las cuatro semanas no mostró signos clínicos durante el periodo experimental. Se observó viremia en todos los patos de ambos grupos. Los mayores títulos virales en las tres aves supervivientes del grupo inoculado a las dos semanas fueron $10^{3.7}\ \text{a}\ 10^{5.3}$ unidades formadoras de placa por mililitro de suero. El título máximo fue de $10^{7.1}$ unidades formadoras de placa por mililitro de suero en los patos de dos semanas que murieron por la infección. Los títulos virales máximos en el grupo inoculado a las cuatro semanas fueron de $10^{4.1}\ \text{a}\ 10^{4.9}$ unidades formadoras de placa por mililitro de suero. La eliminación viral en las cavidades oral y/o cloacal fue observada en las cuatro aves del grupo infectado a las dos semanas y en tres de las aves infectadas a las cuatro semanas de edad. Estos resultados sugieren que los patos aigamo infectados pueden transmitir al virus del Oeste del Nilo. Aunque los patos aigamo son criados en Asia del este, donde el virus del Oeste del Nilo es un patógeno exótico, el virus pudiera ser introducido y diseminado en el futuro, por lo tanto es importante tomar precauciones para prevenir su introducción y se deben preparar medidas para prevenir la infección en granjas de patos aigamo.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
239
    239
  • Thumbnail: Page 
240
    240
  • Thumbnail: Page 
241
    241
  • Thumbnail: Page 
242
    242
  • Thumbnail: Page 
243
    243
  • Thumbnail: Page 
244
    244