Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Indigenous Self-Determination and Applied Anthropology in Canada: Finding a Place to Stand

Michael Asch
Anthropologica
Vol. 43, No. 2 (2001), pp. 201-207
DOI: 10.2307/25606035
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25606035
Page Count: 7
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Indigenous Self-Determination and Applied Anthropology in Canada: Finding a Place to Stand
Preview not available

Abstract

The discipline of anthropology has been undergoing a period of self-reflection and self-doubt. Current wisdom suggests that anthropologists do best when we act to provide context and space for the voices of others and eschew our own voices and agency. I agree wholeheartedly with aspects of this wisdom. We are at our worst when we impose our voices on others, such as by speaking for them or speaking about them as though they were not there. However, withdrawing agency does not resolve the matter. Our agency, our voice is present in all choices, even the choice not to assert it. In this paper, I discuss an approach to asserting our agency in a manner I believe to be just and justifiable. It is based on the view, following Buber and Lévinas, that appropriate agency is fostered when we treat others in an I-Thou rather than an I-It relationship. I indicate, following from the work of Little Bear among others, that the notion of treaty as developed in one strain of Indigenous thought provides an articulation of the I-Thou relationship in the political realm. It fosters a political relationship based on what I term Self and Relational Other rather than Self and Oppositional Other. This form of framing promotes active agency on the part of all participants, including anthropologists. /// La discipline anthropologique a connu une période de réflexion et de doute sur son orientation. La prudence courante maintient que nous faisons mieux de fournir le contexte et l'espace pour la voix des autres et renoncer à notre voix. Je suis d'acoord avec certains aspects de cette prudence. Nous somme "au plus mal" quand noud imposons notre voix aux autres soit que nous parlions pour eux soit que nous parlions d'eux comme s'ils n'étaient pas là. Cependant, se retirer de l'action ne résout pas le problème. Notre action, notre voix est présente dans tous nos choix, même le choix de ne pas s'imposer. Dans ce texte, je présente une manière de revendiquer notre participation d'une façon que je crois juste et justifiable. C'est une perspective qui s'appuie sur la vision, à la suite de Buber et Lévinas, qu'il se produit une action appropriée quand nous traitons les autres en tant que personnes (I-Thou) plutôt que dans une perspective moi-chose. Je montre, à la suite des travaux de Little Bear entre autres, que la notion de traité telle que développée dans une ligne de pensée indigène fournit une articulation de type personnel dans le domaine politique. Elle favorise une relation politique sur la base de ce que je considère le moi en accord avec l'autre plutôt qu'en opposition avec l'autre. Ce type de cadre peut promouvoir une action de la part de tous les participants, y compris les anthropologues.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207