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Ecosystem CO₂ Fluxes of Arbuscular and Ectomycorrhizal Dominated Vegetation Types Are Differentially Influenced by Precipitation and Temperature

Rodrigo Vargas, Dennis D. Baldocchi, José I. Querejeta, Peter S. Curtis, Niles J. Hasselquist, Ivan A. Janssens, Michael F. Allen and Leonardo Montagnani
The New Phytologist
Vol. 185, No. 1 (Jan., 2010), pp. 226-236
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the New Phytologist Trust
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25609605
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ecosystem CO₂ Fluxes of Arbuscular and Ectomycorrhizal Dominated Vegetation Types Are Differentially Influenced by Precipitation and Temperature
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Abstract

Here, we explore how interannual variations in environmental factors (i.e. temperature, precipitation and light) influence CO₂ fluxes (gross primary production and ecosystem respiration) in terrestrial ecosystems classified by vegetation type and the mycorrhizal type of dominant plants (arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) or ecto-mycorrhizal (EM)). We combined 236 site-year measurements of terrestrial ecosystem CO₂ fluxes and environmental factors from 50 eddy-covariance flux tower sites with information about climate, vegetation type and dominant plant species. Across large geographical distances, interannual variations in ecosystem CO₂ fluxes for EM-dominated sites were primarily controlled by internnual variations in mean annual temperature. By contrast, interannual variations in ecosystem CO₂ fluxes at AM-dominated sites were primarily controlled by interannual variations in precipitation. This study represents the first large-scale assessment of terrestrial CO₂ fluxes in multiple vegetation types classified according to dominant mycorrhizal association. Our results support and complement the hypothesis that bioclimatic conditions influence the distribution of AM and EM systems across large geographical distances, which leads to important differences in the major climatic factors controlling ecosystem CO₂ fluxes.

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