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Was Huntington Right about Human Nutrition?

L. Schuyler Fonaroff
Annals of the Association of American Geographers
Vol. 55, No. 3 (Sep., 1965), pp. 365-376
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2561563
Page Count: 12
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Was Huntington Right about Human Nutrition?
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Abstract

Huntington's conclusions relating to food and diets and their relevance to health in Mainsprings of Civilization are no longer acceptable owing to his incorrect evaluations resulting from inaccurate assumptions in two major categories: 1) critical characteristics of food composition, and 2) nutritional requirements for health. The critical nutritional problem in international perspective relates predominantly to protein quality, its availability, production, and consumption. Agricultural geographers with this view in mind can plan more effective programs and more critically evaluate the important elements of the growing pressure of the food- available land relationship.

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