Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Central Artery/Tunnel Project Preservation Program

Beth Anne Bower
Historical Archaeology
Vol. 32, No. 3, Perspectives on the Archaeology of Colonial Boston: The Archaeology of the Central Artery/Tunnel Project, Boston, Massachusetts (1998), pp. 11-18
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25616625
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

The Central Artery/Tunnel Project in Boston is the largest and most complex highway project ever undertaken in the core of a major American city. The project will replace an existing elevated highway, which passes through Boston's historic downtown, with a new underground expressway. In 1984 a Section 106 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between transportation authorities and historic preservation agencies set stipulations designed to preserve and protect archaeological and historic resources within and adjacent to the project right-of-way. Started in the earliest planning stages of the project, the Central Artery/Tunnel Project Preservation Program implemented the MOA through historic structure survey and recording projects, review of future development plans, the Project Conservator Program to protect buildings during construction, and archaeological survey, site examination, and data recovery. The program has surveyed over 450 historic structures, developed guidelines and specifications for protection of potentially impacted historic structures, provided criteria for building and construction monitoring programs, identified and recovered four National Register eligible archaeological sites, and conducted a public information and education program.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[11]
    [11]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18