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Microbiology of Wiltshire Bacon Production [Abstract]

G. A. Gardner
Irish Journal of Food Science and Technology
Vol. 7, No. 1 (1983), p. 82
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25619552
Page Count: 1
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Abstract

This paper is based on a recently published review of the microbiology of bacon and ham manufacture (1). Wiltshire bacon is prepared from a side (trimmed half of carcase) of pork by a process of brine injection, tank curing and maturation. The microbiology of the slaughter and butchery operations and the implications of chilling and refrigerated storage have a profound influence on the microbial status of the pork carcase. The effect of the brine microflora also has an influence on bacon quality and certain species in the brine are a useful indication of production faults. A scheme for testing brines has been evolved by the Ulster Curers' Association Technical Division over the last 20 years and currently includes 5 tests: a direct microscopic count, E. coli I, Pseudomonas, Vibrio and a colony count on nutrient agar containing 4% NaCl. Results were presented and their implications discussed in depth. The microbiology of Wiltshire bacon was examined with regard to methods for routine quality assessment, the most common forms of spoilage and associated technological deficiencies, and the more important microbial species involved.

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