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Life History and Habitat Requirements of the Oregon Forestsnail, Allogona townsendiana (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Polygyridae), in a British Columbia Population

Karen M. M. Steensma, Patrick L. Lilley and Heather M. Zandberg
Invertebrate Biology
Vol. 128, No. 3 (2009), pp. 232-242
Published by: Wiley on behalf of American Microscopical Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25623047
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Life History and Habitat Requirements of the Oregon Forestsnail, Allogona townsendiana (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Polygyridae), in a British Columbia Population
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Abstract

Population size, reproductive timing and habitats, seasonal behaviors, and juvenile activity were assessed in a British Columbia population of the endangered Oregon forestsnail, Allogona townsendiana, over a period of 4 years. Adult snail population size ranged from seven to 47 snails in four × 24-m² sampling sites. The mating period peaked in March and April; adults aggregated in clusters of eight to 14 snails before mating. Pairs of snails were observed to mate for 225 min or more in close proximity to coarse woody debris and stinging nettle, Urtica dioica. Nesting peaked in April—May and resulted in a mean clutch size of 34 eggs (SD = 9). Hatching for two nests occurred at 63 and 64 d after oviposition. Within hours of hatching, juveniles began dispersing from the nest site; by 1 month most had disappeared. Snails tracked with harmonic radar became less active or aestivated from late July to early September and hibernated from early November to mid-March within leaf litter and soil. Preliminary measurements of growth rate indicate this species takes a minimum of 2 years to reach adulthood and has a typical life span of at least 5 years.

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