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Frederick Jackson Turner and American Geography

Frederick Jackson Turner and Robert H. Block
Annals of the Association of American Geographers
Vol. 70, No. 1 (Mar., 1980), pp. 31-42
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2562823
Page Count: 12
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Frederick Jackson Turner and American Geography
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Abstract

Frederick Jackson Turner was a precursor to the modern historical geographer as well as a cofounder of the American subdiscipline. His studies of frontiers, sections, and regions pioneered new paths for interdisciplinary scholarship between history and the earth sciences, particularly geography. In both his scholarship and his teaching career, Turner stressed the importance of geographical understanding and methodology. His personal commitment to the discipline involved him in the professional affairs of the community of American geographers. While much of Turner's empirical work has been superseded in this century, his theories persist as continuing stimulants to geographical thought.

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