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Begging in Rural India and Bangladesh

DEEPTIMA MASSEY, ABDUR RAFIQUE and JANET SEELEY
Economic and Political Weekly
Vol. 45, No. 14 (APRIL 3-9, 2010), pp. 64-71
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25664307
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Begging in Rural India and Bangladesh
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Abstract

This paper makes a case for seeing poor people's experiences of begging as a living strategy propelled by poverty, economic insecurity, ill-health and ageing. Using in-depth interviews with men and women from eastern India and northern Bangladesh, it stresses the narrative accounts of the migrants, their tales of travelling to various destinations and the significance of the remittances they earned. Through these accounts, the aim is to show the resourcefulness and agency required to engage in begging. Begging may be necessary to better respond to food and cash hardships in poor landless households in rural settings. It is neither a deliberate act of avoiding work nor an institutional tradition.

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