Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Aberrant temporal and spatial brain activity during rest in patients with chronic pain

Sanna Malinen, Nuutti Vartiainen, Yevhen Hlushchuk, Miika Koskinen, Pavan Ramkumar, Nina Forss, Eija Kalso and Riitta Hari
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 107, No. 14 (April 6, 2010), pp. 6493-6497
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25665196
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Aberrant temporal and spatial brain activity during rest in patients with chronic pain
Preview not available

Abstract

In the absence of external stimuli, human hemodynamic brain activity displays slow intrinsic variations. To find out whether such fluctuations would be altered by persistent pain, we asked 10 patients with unrelenting chronic pain of different etiologies and 10 sex- and age-matched control subjects to rest with eyes open during 3-T functional MRI. Independent component analysis was used to identify functionally coupled brain networks. Time courses of an independent component comprising the insular cortices of both hemispheres showed stronger spectral power at 0.12 to 0.25 Hz in patients than in control subjects, with the largest difference at 0.16 Hz. A similar but weaker effect was seen in the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas activity of the precuneus and early visual cortex, used as a control site, did not differ between the groups. In the patient group, seed point-based correlation analysis revealed altered spatial connectivity between insulae and anterior cingulate cortex. The results imply both temporally and spatially aberrant activity of the affective pain-processing areas in patients suffering from chronic pain. The accentuated 0.12- to 0.25-Hz fluctuations in the patient group might be related to altered activity of the autonomic nervous system.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[6493]
    [6493]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6494
    6494
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6495
    6495
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6496
    6496
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6497
    6497