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THE IDENTITY AND DEMOGRAPHY OF THE PLAINS-OJIBWA

James H. Howard
Plains Anthropologist
Vol. 6, No. 13 (August, 1961), pp. 171-178
Published by: Maney Publishing on behalf of the Plains Anthropological Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25666353
Page Count: 8
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THE IDENTITY AND DEMOGRAPHY OF THE PLAINS-OJIBWA
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Abstract

One of the largest Indian tribes of the northern praries is the Bungi or Plains-Ojibwa. Despite their importance in the historic period they go unmentioned in most histories. In large part this is due to semantic confusion in their identification by writers and official agencies. In language, social organization, art, ceremonial, and costume the Plains-Ojibwa is a distinct ethnic group. Although they are descended from Woodland groups, 150 years of separate political and cultural existence has made them a distinct tribe. The gradual migration of small Ojibwa groups unto the Plains began near the end of the 18th century. By 1800 those living west of the Red River of the North were beginning to be thought of as a distinct group. However, confusion as to their identity has persisted. At present 2 ethnic groups make up the Plains-Ojibwa, a "full-blood" minority group and a metis group which, although basically Plains-Ojibwa with some Cree admixture, has a large amount of French as well as other European blood.

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