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ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS (MARIE STRUMPEL DISEASE) IN HISTORIC AND PREHISTORIC NORTHERN PLAINS INDIANS

William M. Bass, John B. Gregg and Pierre E. Provost
Plains Anthropologist
Vol. 19, No. 66, Part 1 (November 1974), pp. 303-305
Published by: Maney Publishing on behalf of the Plains Anthropological Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25667227
Page Count: 3
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ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS (MARIE STRUMPEL DISEASE) IN HISTORIC AND PREHISTORIC NORTHERN PLAINS INDIANS
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Abstract

Ankylosing spondylitis, a form of chronic, progressive spinal arthritis, occurs in about 0.05% of the population of England today. Sporadic reports of this abnormality have appeared in literature pertaining to paleopathology, but to date there has been little opportunity to identify and study this process in large, well documented populations of all ages and both sexes. In the study of over 2600 Indian burials from North and South Dakota (at least 1415 of which were over 16 years of age at death) representing several periods in time, but primarily of Arikara origin, and showing many representative demonstrations of arthritis, we have observed only one specimen with definite Marie-Strumpel Disease (0.07%). This incidence compares closely with that found in modern England (0.05%).

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