Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

FORT UNION PORCELLANITE AND FUSED GLASS: DISTINCTIVE LITHIC MATERIALS OF COAL BURN ORIGIN ON THE NORTHERN PLAINS

Dale E. Fredlund
Plains Anthropologist
Vol. 21, No. 73, Part 1 (August 1976), pp. 207-211
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/25667330
Page Count: 5
  • Download ($45.00)
  • Cite this Item
Preview not available
Preview not available

Abstract

Among the most common surface indicators of archaeological sites in south central Montana and northern Wyoming are the grey and red porcellanite flakes resulting from tool making activities. Although one of the major lithic materials used by prehistoric inhabitants of the northern plains region, porcellanite's identity has remained relatively unknown. Amateur and professional archaeologist alike have loosely referred to this material as "metamorphosed siltstone", "baked shale", "Powder River chert", "grey chert", "fired brick", "jasper", etc. Similarly, fused glass is often misrepresented as obsidian. Because of its unique origin, definable area of occurrence (the western coal region, the European coal fields, and perhaps other coal bearing areas), and its extensive utilization by the prehistoric populations of the region, porcellanite and fused glass deserve additional attention from archaeologists.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211